White people collection agency.

You see em, we call them the fuck out.

Spork here, just logged in for the first time in forever, does anyone know how I can get in to contact with the other mod of this blog?

before you speak for saudi women

cynicalapathy:

Do you even know there are ethnic minorities in saudi?

do you even know there was slavery in saudi that was abolished roughly around 1962?

do you even know the name of the current king of Saudi?

Do you know how severe tribalism is in saudi?

Do you know how anti-blackness is very severe in Saudi?

Do you know how hard undocumented saudis have it here?

do you Know Najid?

Do you know Hijaz?

Do you know how oppressed shia are in Saudi?

Do you know how there are saudis from chinese, pakistani, indian, afghani And many other origins from around the globe?

can you tell the regional differences between saudis from their dialects ?

Do you know how hard it is for saudi women who have abusive male guardians ?

Do you know about how by law a girl is supposed to live with her father if her mom gets a divorce?

do you know rape victims are sentenced jail for Adultery ?

do you know how institutionalized racism affects saudis from ethnic minorities?

Do you know how it feels to live in an absolute monarchy?

Do you know about revolts in Qatif?

Do you know Al-Ha’ir?

Do you know madawi al-rasheed, nasser alsaid or Wajeha Al-Huwaider?

Do you know that 13 year old kids are thrown in political jail for protesting for their father’ release?

i am saudi and i can NEVER ,no matter how much i listen or read or talk to other saudis, be able to speak for them so what makes you think you can do it?

(via freshmouthgoddess)

strugglingtobeheard:

Florida reform school abuse scandal widens with discovery of more graves

sinidentidades:

The scale of abuse at a notorious youth residential school in Florida has been laid bare with the release of a report by investigators who say they have evidence of almost 100 deaths at the institution.

Investigators say they believe more graves are yet to be uncovered at the Arthur G Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, which closed a year ago following revelations of the widespread physical and sexual abuse of youths sent there since early last century.

It means the enormity of the outrage, in which survivors have told gruesome stories of regular beatings, rapes and even murders by staff members, is much greater than reported by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in 2010, when the agency announced the presence of 31 grave sites.

“We found nearly twice as many burials as were thought to exist, but many of them had been lost in the woods under brush and trees,” said professor Erin Kimmerle, head of a team of anthropologists and archaeologists from Tampa’s University of South Florida called on to look into deaths at the reform school from 1900 to 1960.

“The cause and manner of death for the majority of cases are unknown. Where causes could be documented, the most common were infectious disease, fires, physical trauma and drowning.”

Many of the victims were young black males sent to the harsh reform school for often minor infractions such as truancy or “incorrigibility”. Kimmerle’s team also studied what little historical documentation and burial records survived and found that deaths commonly followed escape attempts or occurred within three months of a new “inmate” arriving there.

“No understanding of the Florida State Reform School over the course of its history can be understood without consideration of the impact and implications of segregation, particularly those relating to criminal justice,” she said.

“The majority of boys committed to the school and that died there were African American.”

According to their report, the team found records showing 45 individuals buried on school grounds between 1914 and 1952, with 31 bodies sent elsewhere for burial. There were 22 more cases in which no burial site was listed.

Of the 98 deaths they confirmed, two were adult staff members and the rest children aged from six to 18.

Despite the growing scale of the scandal, and graphic recent accounts of life at the school from those who once attended, no charges are expected. Teachers who worked there are mostly long dead, and the FDLE announced two years ago that it was unable to substantiate claims that deaths were caused by school staff or that any staff members abused boys.

Disgusting. If they’ve done it here best believe there are other places. The sickness of whiteness and the desire to use blackness for whatever they want, no one can convince me they are not connected. Jesus this is so scary

CNN: Feds asked to examine Florida school deaths mystery.

(via ladystain)

fsufeminist:

thenerdyintellectual:

I can’t even…but I still will. 

Me and janedoe225 were discussing the selective sociopathy white people have towards oppressed nationalities. No emotion, no empathy, just devoid of even considering the experiences of people of color as valid and truthful or sincere. This is what white supremacy breeds. This is the kind of hate and disgust that white supremacy normalizes so when a fucking kid is killed over loud music, guys like this are justified. 

Ugh. I really can’t. 

Jesus Christ

(via fsufeministalumna)

womenwhokickass:

Robin Lim: Why she kicks ass
She is a Filipino-American midwife and founder of Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Healthy Mother Earth Foundation) health clinics, which offer free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it.
She and her team have been working since 2003 to combat Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates, and was awarded the 2011 CNN Hero of the Year award by the CNN news network, for helping thousands of low-income women in Indonesia with healthy pregnancy and birthservices.
In the first eight months of 2011, the Bumi Sehat Foundation has had more than 20,500 incidences of patient care and assisted in the delivery of almost 400 babies. From its beginnings as a community health and childbirth clinic in Bali, Lim took the Bumi Sehat Foundation to Aceh following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. Combined, the two clinics have facilitated the birth of more than 5,000 babies. And when earthquakes struck, Lim took the project to Yogyakarta in 2006, Padang in 2008 and Haiti in 2010.
Lim is prepared to provide maternal and infant care in the middle of a devastated area with limited materials. Instead of cutting the umbilical cord, for instance, she burns it—especially in disaster zones, because it’s something she can teach midwives and doctors who have lost their instruments. Using scissors to sever the umbilical cord carries a risk oftetanus, while burning the cord mitigates risk of infection. 
In addition to knowing how to safely respond medically, Robin Lim and the Bumi Sehat Foundation don’t have any particular religion, and honor all requests and faith traditions, aiming to help mothers feel safe and supported.
Lim is an advocate for parental rights. Babies are often held by hospitals in Indonesia, until payment is made for birthing services. Parents often relinquish their rights and place their babies up for adoption. Lim’s Yayasan Bumi Sehat birthing sanctuaries offer free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it in Indonesia, where the average family earns the equivalent of $8 a day, and a normal hospital delivery without complications costs around $70. A Caesarean section can cost more than $700.
Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates are caused in part by these costs, which many women cannot meet. In turn, their lives and the lives of their babies are at risk. While some Indonesian celebrities and expatriates choose Bumi Sehat to birth their children, and they often give donations, 80% of the families served by the clinics can barely pay anything.

womenwhokickass:

Robin Lim: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a Filipino-American midwife and founder of Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Healthy Mother Earth Foundation) health clinics, which offer free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it.
  • She and her team have been working since 2003 to combat Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates, and was awarded the 2011 CNN Hero of the Year award by the CNN news network, for helping thousands of low-income women in Indonesia with healthy pregnancy and birthservices.
  • In the first eight months of 2011, the Bumi Sehat Foundation has had more than 20,500 incidences of patient care and assisted in the delivery of almost 400 babies. From its beginnings as a community health and childbirth clinic in Bali, Lim took the Bumi Sehat Foundation to Aceh following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. Combined, the two clinics have facilitated the birth of more than 5,000 babies. And when earthquakes struck, Lim took the project to Yogyakarta in 2006, Padang in 2008 and Haiti in 2010.
  • Lim is prepared to provide maternal and infant care in the middle of a devastated area with limited materials. Instead of cutting the umbilical cord, for instance, she burns it—especially in disaster zones, because it’s something she can teach midwives and doctors who have lost their instruments. Using scissors to sever the umbilical cord carries a risk oftetanus, while burning the cord mitigates risk of infection. 
  • In addition to knowing how to safely respond medically, Robin Lim and the Bumi Sehat Foundation don’t have any particular religion, and honor all requests and faith traditions, aiming to help mothers feel safe and supported.
  • Lim is an advocate for parental rights. Babies are often held by hospitals in Indonesia, until payment is made for birthing services. Parents often relinquish their rights and place their babies up for adoption. Lim’s Yayasan Bumi Sehat birthing sanctuaries offer free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it in Indonesia, where the average family earns the equivalent of $8 a day, and a normal hospital delivery without complications costs around $70. A Caesarean section can cost more than $700.
  • Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates are caused in part by these costs, which many women cannot meet. In turn, their lives and the lives of their babies are at risk. While some Indonesian celebrities and expatriates choose Bumi Sehat to birth their children, and they often give donations, 80% of the families served by the clinics can barely pay anything.

(via biyuti)

African American English is the single most important source for new slang (and, eventually, unmarked everyday colloquial usage) in White American English. Yet White authorities and ordinary people scorn and abuse it in every possible way. African American English is widely regarded as a disorderly form of “slang,” to be discouraged at school and on the job.

Jane H. Hill, The Everyday Language of White Racism (via wretchedoftheearth)

Language, music, poetry, prose, fashion, visual art, religion, technical innovation, social and political innovation and progress — African American culture is the backbone of US culture.

(via zuky)

(via biyuti)

boehner-trollolol:

Okay, listen up!
After some sleuthing around the internet, I have confirmed that this photo is of members of Alpha Chi Omega, Beta Mu chapter at Penn State! 
Soooo, here’s contact information for the parties that must know about this:

Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life at Penn State
Phone:814-863-8065
Email:greeks@sa.psu.edu
Penn State University Panhellenic Council
Advisor: Susan LeGally - sul33@psu.edu
President : Julianne Robbins - jer5229@psu.edu

Penn State Office of Student Conduct
Phone: 814-863-0342
Email: studentconduct@sa.psu.edu

National Alpha Chi Omega Headquarters
Phone: 317.579.5050
Email:http://www.alphachiomega.org/contact.aspx
Susan Hogle, Receptionist - receptionist@alphachiomega.org
Jessica Kelly - Director of Collegiate Experience - jkelly@alphachiomega.org
Cheri O’Neill - Executive Director - coneill@alphachiomega.org
Arianna Maggard - Chapter Consultant - amaggard@alphachiomega.org

LET’S SPREAD THIS LIKE WILDFIRE. LET’S NOT LET ANOTHER GROUP OF STUDENTS BE RACIST AND NOT GET ANY PUNISHMENT FOR IT.

boehner-trollolol:

Okay, listen up!

After some sleuthing around the internet, I have confirmed that this photo is of members of Alpha Chi Omega, Beta Mu chapter at Penn State! 

Soooo, here’s contact information for the parties that must know about this:

Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life at Penn State

Phone:814-863-8065

Email:greeks@sa.psu.edu

Penn State University Panhellenic Council

Advisor: Susan LeGally - sul33@psu.edu

President : Julianne Robbins - jer5229@psu.edu


Penn State Office of Student Conduct

Phone: 814-863-0342

Email: studentconduct@sa.psu.edu


National Alpha Chi Omega Headquarters

Phone: 317.579.5050

Email:http://www.alphachiomega.org/contact.aspx

Susan Hogle, Receptionist - receptionist@alphachiomega.org

Jessica Kelly - Director of Collegiate Experience - jkelly@alphachiomega.org

Cheri O’Neill - Executive Director - coneill@alphachiomega.org

Arianna Maggard - Chapter Consultant - amaggard@alphachiomega.org

LET’S SPREAD THIS LIKE WILDFIRE. LET’S NOT LET ANOTHER GROUP OF STUDENTS BE RACIST AND NOT GET ANY PUNISHMENT FOR IT.

(Source: i-blame-reagan, via stoneagechronicles)

If I look up ‘carrot’ in the dictionary, most people will acknowledge I do not know all there is to know about carrots and if I truly want to understand carrots, I should probably pick up a horticultural text book. We know that legal and medical terms are going to be, at best, simplistically represented and know we need to find a lawyer or a doctor if we want to know more. Anyone deciding to base their argument on, say, a philosophical concept or term using the dictionary is going to be laughed at at best, or automatically lose whatever argument they’re trying to make at least.

Yet the minute we move into a social justice framework, the ultimate authority changes. We don’t need lived experience, we don’t need experts who have examined centuries of social disparities and discrimination, we don’t need societal context. We don’t need sociology or history – no, we have THE DICTIONARY! That ultimate tome of oracular insight, the last word on any debate!

It’s patently ridiculous and you can see that by applying it to any other field of knowledge. But the privileged will continually trot out simplistic, twitter-style dictionary definitions as if they are the last word and the ultimate authority. No-one would drag out the dictionary to debate science with a scientist. But they’re more than willing to trot out a dictionary definition of racism over any sociological analysis. A dictionary is not the ultimate authority - they’re a rough guide for you to discover the simple meaning of words you’ve never heard before – not an ultimate definition of what the word means and all its contexts.

— Sparky at Womanist Musings. (via flowerskss)

(Source: womanist-musings.com, via martellspaytheirdebts)

materialworld:

Scars that Normative Whiteness and Heterosexism Produce: Black Lesbian Experience and Rural Geographies of New England

So excited! My new book is ready for pre-order. The novel focuses on 18 year old Savannah Sales, an African American closeted lesbian who is growing up in rural white New England. Through her character and the relationships she has with others, I explore: internalized racism, normatie whiteness, internalized homophobia, racialized-sexualized violence, connections that food/consumption has to ‘liberation’, and the search for self-love. Her best friend is vegan and encourages Savannah to rethink her sense of justice by pointing out Savannah’s carnicentric and pro-corporate-capitalist consumption habits. This novel is based on my personal experiences growing up in New England and my award winning Dartmouth College thesis research (1998) that focused on black feminism, queer theory, and rural geographies.http://www.amazon.com/SCARS-Breeze-Harper/dp/0985476958/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1351228806&sr=1-1&keywords=“breeze harper
… This novel good for all ages past 18, but in particular, 18-23 year olds. Could be great reading material for college courses focused on sexuality, rural geographies, queer theory, women and gender studies, and Black Studies. It is rare that I find novels exploring the ‘black experience’ that is not in an urban setting and not heteronormative. When I have read about the ‘black experience’ within a Northeast USA context, it always takes place in a city. Scars explores this in rural and white environment. If you would like to pre-order this book, you can click on the image below or above. Kindle is not yet ready for pre-order, but it should be shortly.

(via The Sistah Vegan Project)
Is there no end to the awesomeness of Breeze Harper [aka Sistah Vegan]???

materialworld:

Scars that Normative Whiteness and Heterosexism Produce: Black Lesbian Experience and Rural Geographies of New England

So excited! My new book is ready for pre-order. The novel focuses on 18 year old Savannah Sales, an African American closeted lesbian who is growing up in rural white New England. Through her character and the relationships she has with others, I explore: internalized racism, normatie whiteness, internalized homophobia, racialized-sexualized violence, connections that food/consumption has to ‘liberation’, and the search for self-love. Her best friend is vegan and encourages Savannah to rethink her sense of justice by pointing out Savannah’s carnicentric and pro-corporate-capitalist consumption habits. This novel is based on my personal experiences growing up in New England and my award winning Dartmouth College thesis research (1998) that focused on black feminism, queer theory, and rural geographies.http://www.amazon.com/SCARS-Breeze-Harper/dp/0985476958/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1351228806&sr=1-1&keywords=“breeze harper

… This novel good for all ages past 18, but in particular, 18-23 year olds. Could be great reading material for college courses focused on sexuality, rural geographies, queer theory, women and gender studies, and Black Studies. It is rare that I find novels exploring the ‘black experience’ that is not in an urban setting and not heteronormative. When I have read about the ‘black experience’ within a Northeast USA context, it always takes place in a city. Scars explores this in rural and white environment. If you would like to pre-order this book, you can click on the image below or above. Kindle is not yet ready for pre-order, but it should be shortly.

(via The Sistah Vegan Project)

Is there no end to the awesomeness of Breeze Harper [aka Sistah Vegan]???

(via navigatethestream)